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FourFourOne is proud to bring you the latest episode of our Weekend podcast, where we talk about Dirty Harry and his time in the studio.

Today’s episode is dedicated to one of the biggest stars in pop music today, Dirty Harry.

It’s a tale of his amazing and colourful life, from his early days in the city to his famous career and to his time with the band The Shins.

As part of our coverage, we sat down with the man himself to get the full story.

Today, we get a bit more intimate with the one of Harry’s biggest influences: his childhood friend and producer, Tony Baxter.

Tony tells us about the music Harry played in the streets of London, the music he produced for Dirty Harry’s label, The Shindig, and what Harry meant to him as a producer.

And, in an exclusive interview with FourFour, we talk to Harry about his early life in the capital, what it was like for him to be born in the UK and how he ended up with the Shins’ name.

You know, you don’t think about how people are going to see you.

It was just one of those things where I just sort of thought that the world is just a big blank canvas.

And I was a very good producer, and so was he, so we were very lucky to work with him, so that’s why I think that when I was young I loved music and I always wanted to produce music and write music and produce music.

And then later on, when I started my career, I think it was when I got to know Tony, and I saw his name in the music, and the music was my inspiration, and when I saw the Shindigs name in music, I thought, well, that’s what I want to do too.

And so, I was like, ‘I want to be like that, I want people to look at me, I just want to produce stuff and I want it to be my sound.’

And so, that was what I was really attracted to.

I think I always had a certain sound.

And so I think he’s a very special producer, that he can do the right sound at the right time.

You guys talk about how it was an exciting time for Harry to start his career.

Did you get to spend time with him during that time?

He was there from day one.

I mean, he was just starting to really develop, but we were still on the road together.

And we were just talking, and then we’d go to the studio and just get on with the music.

I think the first time he was in the car with me was at the London gig, and he’d just done a couple of shows, and you’d just kind of be like, wow, it’s a lot of pressure, you know, but he was really relaxed and just just had a great time.

I was so happy for him.

You know, he’d do a show and then I’d just say, ‘Hey, it must be nice to be able to just go to a gig and do a lot and then go home and play.’

And so we did.

I’m sure that when he got back to London, he just went home to his house, and there were a lot more people around, and we were getting along really well.

And he was doing a couple more shows that year, and by the time we went to the London show, he had changed his style.

It had all changed, he wasn’t the same, you can tell, but there were still some of the same ideas that he was putting into the music as he’d been producing.

So we ended up at that London show that year and we played the gig, which was fantastic.

I’ve never really been to the same place ever.

I haven’t really been at the same time in my life, but I’ve been at a lot, I mean I was with The Shintys and the Shinkins and the band the Shinty.

And I think you’d get a lot out of seeing the same band and seeing people that you know and hanging out together, and that was really important.

And it was nice.

So, we’d just play a gig, hang out and have a few drinks and then just go back to his place.

And just go home.

And then, we ended that year up at the studio, and Harry was still doing some gigs, but it was a little bit of a change, it was quite different.

And that was the last time that we ever saw each other.

He’d gone to a few more shows, but then he came back and he was on tour again, so he was back on tour with the same group of people, and it was just different, you’re in a different place and you’re just working on music together.

I don’t know how he did it, but that was pretty important for him